DAY 2: Tashkent:

Breakfast

 

Excursion over Tashkent

Visit the architectural complex “Khazret-Imam” incl. necropolis of imam Abu Bakr Muhammad al-Kaffal Shashi who was one of the first Muslim imams and a famous divine and poet (16th c), “Barak-khan Medressa” – built by Suyunidj-khan – the first ruler of the Uzbek dynasty of the Sheibanid’s (16th c), “Tellya Sheikh Medressa” also called “Khast Imom Mosque” where Osman Quran – the world’s oldest is kept (19th c), “Juma Mosque” (15-19th cc)

 

Visit of Chor Su Bazaar

Tashkent Bazaar Chorsu, the age of which is more than hundred years, also was always located on the main square of the city Eski-Juva. Old bazaar constructions destroyed and went bad, but the traditional architecture remained unchanged – domed large premises. This was the only way to protect oneself from heat and dust in terms of hot and dry Asian climate. On counters of this oriental Bazaar you will find fresh fruits, amber-colored dried fruits, toasted bread (lepeshka), fresh-killed meat, kazy (horse meat sausage), and what not… And all these things are so attractive that one can’t stand to pass by them. Next to bazaar there are choykhonas, where you can taste amber yellow pilaf, fragrant shashlyk (grilled meat), hot shurpa (soup).

 

Visit The State Art Museum of Uzbekistan

The State Art Museum of Uzbekistan was established in 1918. Its initial fund comprised of 100 works of sculpture, paintings, drawings, porcelain by Russian and Western European masters from the collections of the Prince Romanov and other private collections of that time, nationalized by the Soviet government after the revolution.

Almost since its inception, the Art Museum’s collection has rapidly replenished with exhibits from the Turkestan Regional museum, Moscow and Leningrad museums, and it included the works of Uzbek artists.

The works of I.Shishkin, P. Benkov, V.Vereshchagin, Z. Kovalevsky, A. Belloli and many other famous artists are in the museum’s fund to this day.

 

Visit Museum of Applied Art of Uzbekistan

History of Museum of Applied Art of Uzbekistan dates back to 1927, when the first exhibition of artworks by artists of Uzbekistan was held here.

Initially, the museum was called the Museum of Handicrafts, and in 1997 it was granted the state status and acquired its present name.

The Museum of Applied Art fund lists over 7,000 samples of applied arts: handmade embroidery, skull-caps (tyubeteyka), jewelry, carpets and other examples of craftsmanship of the beginning of the 19th century to present day.

 

Overnight in Tashkent